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BuildingGreen Hiring an Administrative Assistant to Work on Exciting New Project

Posted January 20, 2016 11:50 AM by Candace Pearson
Related Categories: Op-Ed

The BuildingGreen staff at their best. Photo: Alana FichmanThe BuildingGreen staff at their best. Photo: Alana FichmanAre you ready to be part of a small team with a big task: proving a green economy grows jobs?

BuildingGreen recently seized the opportunity to make a huge impact locally and we’re looking for an administrative assistant and project coordinator to help implement the master plan.

Our home base of Brattleboro, VT and surrounding region is a unique microcosm where beatniks still endure and back-to-the-landers thrive (BuildingGreen employees included). As a result, the area has accrued an exceptionally high number of experts and companies specializing in sustainability and green building.

BuildingGreen’s Insider Intel for Gaming the AIA’s COTE Top Ten

Posted December 11, 2015 6:33 PM by Nadav Malin
Related Categories: BuildingGreen's Top Stories

Insider, eyes-only info on the AIA Top Ten is enclosed. A retinal scan will initiate, using your computer’s built-in camera. Do not look away.

Brief provided by Agent Malin. Code name: El Presidente.

Don't let the friendly smile fool you. Larry Strain is armed (with data) and dangerous (to climate change).The American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment (COTE) Top Ten awards for 2016 is open for submissions until January 19, 2016.

This internationally acclaimed awards program is the only one that strives to reward both exceptional design—from an aesthetic and user-experience perspective—and high performance in the areas of sustainability and resilience. Having one or more COTE Top Ten winners is an important feather in your firm’s cap.

Trying to decide whether to participate this year? Or which or your several super cool high-performance projects to submit? Keep in mind that winning projects vary from year to year: it’s all about the priorities and agendas of the judges. So don’t forget to do your homework on the jury.

Schooled by Peter Yost: An Interview with the Educator of the Year

Posted September 29, 2015 4:21 PM by Candace Pearson
Related Categories: Awards

BuildingGreen’s building science expert shares reflections, hopes, and—as always—practical building advice after receiving two national teaching awards.

By Candace Pearson

Peter Yost (center) being awarded the Educator of the Year Award by the Energy Center of Wisconsin (now Seventhwave). Photo: SeventhwavePeter Yost lives and breathes by the motto “There’s no hygrothermal free lunch,” and any student of his has that phrase as fundamentally entrenched in their brain as ’I’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’.

That’s the true mark of a great teacher. But winning awards doesn’t hurt either, and this year, Peter was recognized as Green Building Educator of the Year by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and awarded the Energy Center of Wisconsin’s (now renamed Seventhwave) Educator of the Year Award for 2015.

Green Building Materials 101: A Syllabus Supplement

Posted June 17, 2015 9:22 AM by
Related Categories: BuildingGreen's Top Stories

College professors: here’s a curriculum module for introducing students to healthier and lower-impact products and materials using BuildingGreen articles.

Intended for design professionals, BuildingGreen provides an independent “living textbook” that integrates perfectly with green building courses while exposing students to the most cutting-edge sustainability strategies and real-world green building case studies.

The first half of the course goes topic by topic, while the second half goes product category by product category, using MasterFormat indexing. These can be broken into two eight-week mini-courses as needed.

Here we offer an Intro to Green Materials curriculum especially formulated for institutions that have access to the following articles through a campus-wide BuildingGreen subscription.

Don’t have a subscription yet? Find out how to get a no-strings-attached free trial for your campus.

Week 1—Welcome and Introductions

Lecture: Green building is about a lot more than products and materials

Video: TED Talk by William McDonough on Cradle to Cradle design

Readings:

Sustainable Design 101: A Syllabus Supplement

Posted June 11, 2015 4:06 PM by Paula Melton
Related Categories: BuildingGreen's Top Stories

College professors: here’s a curriculum module you can use to introduce students to sustainable design using BuildingGreen articles.

Intended for design professionals, BuildingGreen provides an independent “living textbook” that integrates perfectly with sustainable design courses while exposing students to the most cutting-edge sustainability strategies and real-world green building case studies.

Here we offer an Intro to Sustainable Design curriculum especially formulated for institutions that have access to the following articles through a campus-wide BuildingGreen subscription.

Don’t have a subscription yet? Find out how to get a no-strings-attached free trial for your campus.

Introduction to Sustainable Design: Syllabus and Assigned Readings

Week 1—Welcome and Introductions

Lecture: Introduction to the green building movement

Video: PBS Architecture 2030 Ed Mazria – Design e2

Readings:

What Is a Hygrothermal Building Assessment?

Posted April 29, 2015 11:06 AM by Peter Yost
Related Categories: BuildingGreen's Top Stories

pete mugPeter Yost

Hygro refers to water, and thermal refers to heat. In buildings, you really can’t manage heat without also managing moisture. For example, if you increase how much insulation is in a wall, you may also be increasing the risk of moisture and mold problems.

There are four ways that buildings can get wet:

  • bulk water leaks (rain dripping through a hole in your roof)
  • wicking (groundwater being pulled up through a concrete foundation)
  • air leaks (condensation inside a wall assembly)
  • vapor diffusion (high interior relative humidity in the winter; high exterior relative humidity in the summer)

 And there are just three ways they can dry when they get wet:

  • drainage (intentional spaces between building components)
  • air flow (convective drying, like your hair dryer)
  • evaporation (low relative humidity and adding the sun for drying)

Frankly, four against three can add up to less than the greatest odds for drying.

Leaders in Sustainable Design Speaking at AIA Convention 2015

Posted April 27, 2015 2:48 PM by Alana Fichman
Related Categories: AIA Convention, BuildingGreen's Top Stories

Looking for the greenest updates at Convention this year? Here is our quick roundup.

Image: The AIAAs architects and other design professionals from around the nation gather in Atlanta this week, they will find that the gap between design and sustainable design is narrower than ever. But if you are looking for the greenest talks of them all, look no further! Many of today’s greatest minds in sustainable design will be sharing their stuff—with everything from specifying healthier building materials to the latest on resilient design leadership to geeking out on energy modeling.

Don’t see your sustainability-related session here? Add it in the comments below! Hope to see you there.

Wednesday, May 13

Transforming Firm Culture and Process; Embracing Sustainability and Getting to 2030

Nadav Malin, Barbra Batshalom, Betsy del Monte

8:30 a.m.– 5:30 p.m., All Day Workshop, WE205, Room B304

 

How To Specify Healthy Building Materials

Mike Manzi, Stacey Glass, Tom Lent, Bill Walsh, Russell Perry

A new round of online BAC Sustainable Design courses is starting up soon. Going out in the polar vortex is not a prerequisite.

Learn about resilience features—like the biomimicry of this HOK-designed orphanage in Haiti—without having to actually face the elements? Sounds good to me. Photo: HOK.I’m about to start teaching another round of my online course, Resilient Design, at Boston Architectural College (BAC), and this provides an opportunity to reflect on teaching at BAC and, more broadly, the online instruction in sustainable design offered through this program.

20 excellent online courses

I first started teaching at BAC in 2005, when the college’s online instruction program in sustainable design was just getting under way. At that time, BuildingGreen partnered with BAC to help design the curriculum, find the best instructors available, and promote the courses being offered.

Early on, when we had just a handful of courses, I taught Sustainable Design as a Way of Thinking, a course now being ably taught by my friend David Foley. Today, the online offerings totaling almost 20 courses are housed in BAC’s Sustainable Design Institute.

Have You Been Conflating Water with Energy? Here Are 5 Reasons to Stop

Posted March 2, 2015 11:02 AM by Nadav Malin
Related Categories: BuildingGreen's Top Stories

Until we stop talking about water as if it’s a clone of energy, water won’t get the respect it deserves or the attention it needs. Two sessions at NESEA’s BuildingEnergy ’15 conference, “Reinventing the Water Grid” parts one and two, are out to change that.

Photograph by Mike Peel, mikepeel.net. CC BY-SA 4.0.Policy wonks have been saying for years that water is THE critical resource on our planet—even more so than energy. Yet the time and attention that we devote to water remains a fraction of that we allot to energy.

I think that the problem is that we tend to talk about water conservation and efficiency as if water is just a clone of energy. Water and energy are similar in many ways, but there are key differences; until we appreciate these differences and embrace water on its own terms, we’ll continue to dis it.

Here are the five key differences that are confusing our approach:

A Virtual Mastermind Group for Material Vetting

Posted February 17, 2015 2:58 PM by Paula Melton
Related Categories: BuildingGreen's Top Stories

Want help researching and screening products for LEED v4 or the LBC Red List? Use this forum to share your questions and frustrations as well as your successes and advice.

By Paula Melton

Our recent webcast, Deep Material Vetting That Won’t Chew Through Your Design Budget, included a “homework” assignment: Chris and Scott of Re:Vision Architecture asked everyone to vet three to five materials they’re considering using in a current project.

Expecting that this exercise would lead to frustrations as well as triumphs, we have set aside this space as a forum for you to share how your research is going. Whether your project is pursuing WELL, LEED, Living Building Challenge, a different certification, or no certification at all, let’s help each other out and make the process easier for everyone.

If you haven’t already, you’ll need to create a free BuildingGreen login in order to post comments.

Be kind, and good luck!

p.s. Want to do some background reading on material vetting before you jump into the deep end? Check out these resources.

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