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Webcast signup includes:

  • One-hour webcast
  • PDF download of slides
  • 1 CE hour for AIA, ILFI, and GBCI (LEED-specific)

About the presenters

John Boecker

John is a founding partner of 7group, an internationally recognized multi-disciplinary consulting firm focused on green and regenerative development. He has served on the LEED Steering Committee and is a former chair of the USGBC’s national LEED Curriculum Committee.

John is LEED faculty and a LEED Fellow, and in 2009 he co-authored the seminal book The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building.

Tristan Roberts

Tristan is editor of LEEDuser.com, a website that provides how-to resources for LEED certification teams. Tristan is also Editorial Director for BuildingGreen, publishers of LEEDuser as well as Environmental Building News, GreenSpec, and BuildingGreen.com.

ON-DEMAND WEBCAST

The key to cost-effective high performance—in LEED and non-LEED projects alike

Making payback considerations irrelevant

During Schematic Design, a New Jersey project team identified 13 energy efficiency measures and modeled them as individual systems with a total cost of $124,000 and a simple payback of about 3.5 years.

But by optimizing the combination of EEMs, the project was able to downsize its HVAC system by 40%, reducing its first capital costs for construction by over $275,000 AND reducing annual energy consumption by over $80,000/year—eliminating the need to have a payback discussion.

The key to finding these savings? The project team employed an integrative process during design that recognized the project as a set of inter-related systems rather than a combination of separate components.

An Integrative Process expert shows how to unlock first cost and operational savings

What does integrative process mean in practice? A new BuildingGreen webcast—Building as an Organism: Understanding the Integrative Process Credit in LEED v4—features expert John Boecker, AIA, LEED Fellow, who was intimately involved in writing LEED v4’s new Integrative Process credit.

In this webcast, John walks you through what the IP credit means...how to take advantage of its opportunities…and engage in a process that yields far better building performance than conventional means.

If you’re new to Integrative Process, how to get started

The Integrative Design Process is different from the conventional, or linear, design process. A linear process approaches each problem directly and separately, while an integrated process approaches each problem from the varied viewpoints of multiple participants and the issues they represent.

You will learn:

  • Details for how the overall time frame for integrative design process from project inception to the delivery of bidding documents can remain the same as for traditional design process—but the allocation of effort becomes redistributed
  • Why 70% of environmental impacts are made during the first 10% of the design process
  • How to begin with research and analysis on four key subsystems—site, water, energy and materials—prior to a goal-setting charrette
  • How to get input from all key stakeholders and members of the design team before schematic design begins
  • How the front end loading of analysis allows for the CD phase to be significantly reduced and utilized for documenting earlier design decisions

Already doing Integrative Process, a.k.a Integrated Design? Here’s how to document it for LEED

  • How the LEED v4 IP credit focuses on water and energy, and leverages documentation you’re probably creating already
  • Tools to explore your energy and water options
  • Compliance and documentation strategies for the IP credit
  • How the IP credit can help you to achieve other LEED energy and water credits

This webcast features real-world examples of integrative design processes, cost savings and superior outcomes

  • How one project team persuaded a developer to invest in high-performance windows—allowing for the elimination of perimeter heating and downsizing of the HVAC system
  • How a water input and output analysis for a mixed-use development in the arid west enabled major reductions in long-term demand on the area’s aquifer
  • How one simple question to a project team’s mechanical engineer led to huge first cost and operational savings
© 2014 BuildingGreen, Inc.