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A Lesson

Posted November 19, 2010 09:29 AM by Emily Catacchio
Related Categories: BuildingGreen's Top Stories, Greenbuild '10

Throughout all of the educational sessions I have attended so far—all on different topics—there has been one overarching theme: community; building communities that really work is the way of the future. One large tie to this is connectivity, pun intended. I have heard many case studies from airports to infill developments about connecting neighborhoods to create communities. A major hurdle in sustainable community development is reducing the turnover rate—by creating spaces where people feel connected they more likely to remain, permanently. The more connected people feel to a place the more they value it, protect it, and care for it and the planning, architecture, and interior design can discourage or encourage this behavior. Sustainable means long lasting, just as much as it means “green” and communities can be the deciding factor, determining the longevity of built environments.

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Comments

1 We wholeheartedly agree with posted by Energywyze on 11/20/2010 at 08:28 pm

We wholeheartedly agree with this blog. Connectivity and responsibility in key personnel does help greatly in sustaining a business. Too, often with our company, we enter a business to help with Energy Efficiency only to come across personnel or front desk employees who either don't care or just outright too busy to connect. If the receptionist, secretary or foreman don't have value within the business they are in, then great opportunities will pass the company by. A company that is connected and cares with great value have a team and not just robots working for their paychecks.


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