LIVE image

State-of-the-art testing chambers show that liquid-applied barriers outperform more typical weather barriers comprised of flashing, tape, and membranes.

BEA's building assembly test chamber in Clackamas, Oregon.
Photo Credit: Alex Wilson

When I was in Portland, Oregon for the 2014 Living Future Conference I had an opportunity to visit a facility in nearby Clackamas where building assemblies and components can be tested for water intrusion and water vapor penetration.

Prosoco, a leading manufacturer of liquid-applied membranes developed the Clackamas test facility with partner company Building Envelope Innovations (BEI).

A Cat 5 hurricane in a closed chamber

At the Clackamas test facility Building Envelope Analysis (BEA)—a joint venture between Prosoco and BEI—has two specialized test chambers that can be used to simulate weather conditions as well as more insidious humidity conditions that can drive moisture into wall assemblies or damage building components like insulation and sheathing.

With the large chamber we watched as the submarine-like glass doors were closed and the fury of wind and driving rain were cranked up on the controls. We could see on manometers just how much pressure the wall assembly was having to endure, and we could watch high-pressure nozzles spraying high-velocity streams of water at the assembly.

Tom Schneider of Building Envelope Innovations explaining operation of the large test chamber.
Photo Credit: Alex Wilson

The operator can turn a few dials and simulate 150 mph wind and driving rain—wreaking havoc on the wall assembly constituents.

Prosoco company president David Boyer and BEI director of operations Tom Schneider explained how the test chamber can easily be configured to test everything from plywood sheathing and flashing systems, to windows and weather-barrier tapes.

When we visited, a high-tech, European window that had been submitted by a local Passive House builder for testing was blocked off, because it had failed so miserably that we would have had water all over the place if it hadn’t been sealed off.

Prosoco’s interest in all this testing

We didn’t get into too much detail about building the test chambers, but it appeared that hundreds of thousands of dollars had gone into designing and fabricating them. Why would Prosoco and BEI go to all this effort and expense?

BEI developed and Prosoco manufacturers liquid-applied membranes for building assemblies, and the companies want to show off how much better they perform than the far-more-common assemblage of weather-resistive barriers and specialized building tapes.

Manometers and other gauges on the test chamber.
Photo Credit: Alex Wilson

The bottom line is that the liquid-applied weather barriers, such as Prosoco's R-Guard Cat 5 Air and Water-Resistive Barrier, do a lot better than the more common taped membrane systems. While one can question how accurately the test chamber simulates real conditions, the demonstration was compelling.

In addition to the large test chamber for testing whole wall assemblies and components, there was also a smaller chamber used for testing the permeability (or vapor diffusion) of specific materials—like plywood and weather-resistive barriers.

With this discussion, I was fascinated to learn that the standard methods we use to measure the permeability of different materials to water vapor are grossly flawed. David explained that the permeability of a material that has a listed perm rating (based on standardized ASTM test methods) of 36 may drop to a perm rating of only 2 when that material gets damp from high humidity.

The smaller test chamber used for measuring moisture diffusion through different materials.
Photo Credit: Alex Wilson

Prosoco and BEI have even more sophisticated test chambers in Florida and Kansas. In addition to testing the effects of wind and wind-driven rain, the Florida facility, which I’m hoping to visit sometime, can test resistance to sudden flood or tidal surges of three to four feet.

With growing focus on resilience and adaptation to climate change, dealing with storm surges in low-lying coastal areas will become more and more important.

For related information, see BuildingGreen's course on high-performance building assemblies, as well as our EBN feature, Verifying Performance with Building Enclosure Commissioning.

Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.

If you enjoyed this article, sign up for BuildingGreen email updates

*

Comments

1 How does the new membrane work? posted by robert hesson on 06/16/2014 at 10:52 am

I would like to know if y'all are doing any projects in the South: LA, MS,TX, & AR.
THANKS,
Bob Hesson.

2 Robert,Yes we have many posted by Tom Schneider on 06/20/2014 at 02:59 pm

Robert,
Yes we have many projects in the South. The materials lend themselves to the damp application conditions, the risk of storms, storm surge and the need for dry insulation materials to reduce energy loads.
The notion that a perm rating lifted off a product datasheet and the way it is measured is considered reliable has led to false hopes and failure in this region.
When we finally admit that buildings get wet in spite of our best intentions and egos, we will look more carefully at how well it dries and build dying capacity into the assembly.
The chambers are used to define what means and measures can be undertaken to ensure that when the structure gets wet (and it will) it can be restored to a dry condition that allows materials to perform as expected.


— Share This Posting!

Recent Discussions

posted by jrice01720
on Nov 22, 2014

I did ultimately install a Geospring in the basement of my house (prettygoodlakehouse.com). I can't hear it at all in the living space but the...

posted by atwilson
on Nov 22, 2014

Our Geospring water heater is located in our basement, separated from the living space only by an uninsulated floor. If the door to the basement...

posted by jacksonlui
on Nov 21, 2014

i've been looking at these water heat pumps and the hidden costs and considerations are installation requirements (30A circuit), location of...

Recent Comments


7 Tips to Get More from Mini-Split Heat Pumps in Colder Climates

David Leffingwell says, "Hi Amy, I'm looking for an installer in Southern NH. Who did your install?" More...

bob coleman says, "The units stop to defrost regardless of snowfall, the colder it gets the more they defrost. A roof can help protect it from being buried by deep..." More...

Amy InNH says, "$21K? How much square footage? My two Fujitsu mini-splits heat/cool 1600 sq ft and cost $6K for both, including installation. I got them for the A..." More...

Amy InNH says, "Hi Kevin. My two Fujitsu mini split heat pumps take care of 1600 sq ft, one for each floor. First floor is open, second floor doors must be open..." More...


A Look at Heat Pump Water Heaters

Joseph Rice says, "I did ultimately install a Geospring in the basement of my house (prettygoodlakehouse.com). I can't hear it at all in the living space but the..." More...


Green Topics