LIVE image
Ah, if only it were possible to be a fly-on-the-wall in every committee for every standard... I know this is a fantasy only a standards-geek could have, and is one of those fantasies you don't really want to actualize, but there's no doubt much of the real work defining the rules of the game is done in committee meetings that most of us never hear about. In their last meeting, with little fanfare, the NSF-140 committee approved a simple change that greenwash-fighters should approve of, while finding the need for it unfortunate. The language in the standard was changed to say, "A certified and non-certified product cannot have the same trade name designation." What this means is that a company can't get, for example, NSF-140 Platinum on select options for a product line, and then go and market the main product line as NSF-140 Platinum. Apparently, this issue was brought to the table because one company was doing just that — marketing the product line as NSF-140 Platinum despite the fact that the platinum prerequisite of 10% post-consumer recycled material was only met with special order options. The discrepancy is being fixed by the company — as is the standard by NSF. The NSF-140 committee also removed a durability test that required 350 parts per million of fluorocarbons for stain resistance (after debating the counter-intuitive rationale for including a test in a sustainability standard that requires addition of an environmentally problematic substance). They also required less persistent C6 instead of C8 fluorocarbons; a change that suppliers are apparently making proactively given growing concern over the potential environmental and health impacts of fluorocarbons. None of this is final — there is more discussion to come and then at some point the decisions will be folded into the next version. But in general, I'd call all of this a good story of self-correction by the industry. When competitors police each other's greenwash and have animated discussions on proving durability without compromising other aspects of sustainability, we're starting to get somewhere — recognizing of course, that we still have a long way to go. From EBN: Making Carpet Environmentally Friendly and more

If you enjoyed this article, sign up for BuildingGreen email updates

*

Comments

1 Amen posted by JAB on 07/31/2009 at 09:14 am

Amen


— Share This Posting!

Recent Discussions

Matrix Total Home System
posted by buildingshelter
on Aug 26, 2014

Does anyone have experience with the Matrix by NTI?

posted by behrlich
on Aug 13, 2014

Hi Evan, We share your nano concerns, and as a precaution, GreenSpec does not list nanotechnology products. I chatted with another one of their...

posted by levi
on Aug 13, 2014

My wife looked into this product and was told by a manufacturer's rep that Armor products rely on nano technology to achieve it's high strength....

Recent Comments


7 Tips to Get More from Mini-Split Heat Pumps in Colder Climates

Nan Kul says, "I am on my third through the wall Frigidair heat pump in my sunroom in the last 25 years. It is so Noisy. I am planning to switch to a 12000 btu..." More...

Robert Henshaw says, "Thanks for the comments" More...

Ruth Schneider says, "Interesting...definitely want mini split/ductless. So are F and M equal in quality? Mits has the most contractors/dealers near to us. " More...

bob coleman says, "The Mits is a min-split The Lennox is likely a typical HVAC heat pump system, with indoor ducts, and a cabinet indoors with a larger heat pump..." More...


Foam-In-Place Insulation: 7 Tips for Getting Injection and Spray Foam Right

J.R. Anderson says, "The performance is in the details. This was a very good article from that viewpoint." More...