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Ball State Installs Largest (and most Educational) Ground-Source System in U.S.

Posted March 23, 2012 10:28 AM by Paula Melton
Related Categories: Colleges and Universities

The district heating and cooling system will replace coal boilers, cutting the university's carbon footprint in half and saving $2 million a year. It's also a learning opportunity for students.

This energy station for Ball State's ground-source district heating and cooling system is designed so that students and visitors can learn about the system and see how much energy it uses.

With 3,600 bore holes, a massive new ground-source heat pump system at Ball State University is going to become the largest system of its kind in the U.S. when it is fully operational in 2014. It is already cooling 47 campus buildings and heating 20, and it will eventually heat and cool all of them, according to the university.

It's part of Ball State's long-standing leadership on green campus issues, including the interdisciplinary Greening of the Campus conference series, in its ninth year, where the new ground-source system was recently dedicated.

BuildingGreen on Campus

Posted September 28, 2009 11:11 AM by Michael Wentz
Related Categories: Colleges and Universities

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